Interview with photographer Brendan Pattengale

YOUNG BLOOD

03/28/2017

The color of blood is influenced by the amount of oxygen it possesses. The closer to the arteries, the brighter the red. The further it gets from those arteries, the darker the red. Fahey/Klein Gallery is pleased to present “Young Blood” a group show featuring four young artists working within the tradition of color photography. These photographers are embracing traditional dark room techniques while pushing the boundaries of the digital color print. Each artist is using the medium to investigate the new directions of color photography with the vigor and the dedication of a scientist looking for a cure. Fahey/Klein Gallery is looking forward to the opportunity to invigorate these artists with the oxygen they need to help their color work shine brightly.

Brendan Pattengale (b. 1984) is an American photographer. Taking up the tradition of landscape photography to situate his musings, Pattengale probes photographic methods as well as the truth in color perception. His photographs are strikingly abstract, psychedelic in the way that they vividly depict valleys and vistas, yet they maintain a certain realism in the subject matter. Utilizing an unorthodox set of tools to capture his chosen terrain—Pattengale travels to the far reaches of the world to find new sceneries—he calls into question the role of the camera as vicarious viewer relative to an image making process that involves other mechanical and non-mechanical agents. As was said by Goethe in his Theory of Colors, colors belong to the eye; Pattengale conveys this in his images, which are entirely true in their retelling of light and, therefore, vision, while they are also altered in their process prior to the instant of the photograph.